LESSON 50

If we write what we feel, feel what we write, we usually come up with a meaningful poem.  Because poetry comes from the heart, as well as the head, it must be about something that speaks about us, as well as to us.  It needs to be not only passionate, but purposeful, as well.

I like to suggest to my students that poetry needs to be about believing.  It can be a truth, a message or, it can be about politics, love, possibilities, personal or as distant as the stars.  What it can’t be is trite or lacking in a commitment of self – becoming a part of the poem using sensory imagery: to see, to hear, to taste, to touch, to smell. And then, perhaps most importantly, it must express your feelings.

I would like to suggest that nothing generates so much emotional energy as our relationships with our pets.  In my family, it has always been dogs but perhaps, in yours, it is cats or hamsters, birds or fish, horses or farm animals.  Whatever four-legged, winged, finned, furry or sleek animal you have given your heart to, could, perhaps, be brought to life for us, through the wonder of words, poetry, imagery, and intense feelings.

Begin your poem with sensory feelings: 

Her fur, soft as the petals

On a summer rose…

 

Her breathing takes me

Like a prayer through

The long night…

 

The scent of her is damp earth

And woody secrets only

She knows…

Using the five senses, find a starting point and then let your memories, your feelings, your heart take you through the poem.  Share with us by clicking on www.poetladykatz.com and then heading over to the Chat Room.  I would love to read your “Pet Poem.”

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